Fine Arts Academy

Visual Arts

The Visual Arts Program at the Fine Arts Academy currently focuses on the development of students’ technical skills and critical thinking in a variety of media. The visual art aspect of the larger integrated curriculum emphasizes the application of art elements and principles of design in art production, the study of art history and diverse cultural heritages, and the development of visual discrimination and judgment through art criticism and aesthetics.

Upon successful completion of Visual Arts Foundations, students may take year-long courses in drawing, painting, printmaking, fibers, sculpture, ceramics, digital photography, and jewelry. Advanced placement studio courses are also available.

To graduate with a major in visual arts, students are required to complete six credits in art, including one in art history.

Visual Arts Course Descriptions

(Click here for Visual Arts Major curriculum reqs.)

Advanced Placement (AP) Art History: Students will experience works of art virtually and in person through observation, discussion, reading and research.  The course will explore major forms of artistic expression including architecture, sculpture, painting and other media from across a variety of cultures. Students will learn about the purpose and function of art by developing an ability to articulate visual and art historical concepts in verbal and written form.  The curriculum framework outlines big ideas and essential questions leading an exploration through 250 works of art from 10 content areas. This course is approved by College Board and is designed to meet the requirements of a 2-semester introductory college level course.

Advanced Placement (AP) in Art:  This year-long course is designed for Seniors (and Juniors) who wish to develop a portfolio for College Board AP credit, college admission, career placement, and/or scholarship applications. The Advanced Placement Drawing Studio class is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art.  A.P. Studio Art is not based on a final written examination; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year.  At McCallum we offer, AP Studio Drawing, AP Studio 2-D Design and AP 3-D Design.  Students choose the appropriate class based on the media and type of work they create.  For example, a photography student should take 2-D design, as opposed to the drawing studio class.  Throughout the year, students are expected to develop a strong portfolio of work, explore a variety of concepts and ideas, incorporate an exploration and knowledge of art history, exhibit their work and engage in peer, individual and group art critiques.  Prerequisite:  Art 1 (recommended for students who have continuously developed their art skills and concepts throughout high school).

Ceramics 1,2,3: The study of ceramics includes functional as well as sculptural forms. This course includes instruction in hand building and throwing on the potter’s wheel. Students study the history of ceramics and sculpture as it relates to the assignments. Prerequisite: Art 1.  Students are required to take each class in level succession upon passing each course.

Commercial Photography and Advanced Commercial Photography:  In Digital Photography students will learn how to create contemporary art photographs. They will use Adobe Creative Cloud as a tool for editing, and manipulation of images. The focus will be centered on photography as an art form, and as a commercial product. Students will learn photographic tools such as composition, lighting, and a conceptual vision of photographic content. This course will require considerable time to take photographs outside of school. Prerequisite:  Art 1 or Arts/AV Principles.  Students are required to take each class in level succession upon passing each course.

Drawing 1,2,3: The primary purpose of Drawing 1,2 and 3 is to gain an understanding of two-dimensional design with an emphasis on drawing.  Students are expected to develop a working knowledge of a variety of artistic, painting media, while increasing their ability to see, analyze and use formal elements of art. To begin, formal drawing elements and understanding of media and technique will be our focus.  As the year progresses, we will explore how visual elements relate to artistic expression, concept and content.  In addition, students will be introduced to a variety of art movements, visual images and artists throughout history.  Any drawing class (after Art I) is considered advanced and is targeted to students with interest in developing their drawing skills.  Drawing 2 and 3 students will receive weighted credit for their class.  Although classes are “stacked,” the lessons, projects and curriculum is differentiated for each level. Prerequisite:  Art 1.  Students are required to take each class in level succession upon passing each course.

Fibers 1,2,3:  Students explore techniques such as weaving, knotting, sitchery, and dyeing, separately and in combination of other media. General areas that will also be explored are textile designs using basic printing methods, basic hand and machine sewing techniques, various image transfers techniques and basic fashion and apparel designing. They will explore and utilize a variety of natural and synthetic materials to create their work while applying the art elements and principles of design.  Students in the upper levels will be encouraged to concentrate their work in one or more areas of fiber methods while continuing their development in applying the art elements and principles of design. Prerequisite:  Art 1.  Students are required to take each class in level succession upon passing each course.

Jewelry 1,2,3:  Students use natural and human-made materials such as metals, wood, clay, paper-maché, and Plexiglas, in casting, and carving, separately and in combination. The student explore and develop their skills in basic jewelry techniques such as fabrication of links, incorporating beads, enameling, etching in metal, texturing of metal, combining of copper, brass and silver metals, soldering techniques, and ring making of wire and sheet metal. They explore positive/negative space, personal adornment, function, experimental shapes, and individual techniques while applying art elements and principles of design.  Students in the upper levels will be encouraged to concentrate their work in one or more areas of jewelry making techniques while continuing their development in applying the art elements and principles of design.Prerequisite:  Art 1.  Students are required to take each class in level succession upon passing each course.

Painting 1,2,3:  The Painting courses at McCallum provide students with an understanding of two-dimensional design with an emphasis on painting.  Students will develop a working knowledge of a variety of artistic painting media, while increasing their ability to see, analyze and use formal elements of art and principles of design.  To begin, formal painting elements and understanding of media and technique will be our focus.  As the year progresses, we explore how visual elements relate to artistic expression, concept and content.  In addition, students will be introduced to a variety of art movements, visual images and artists throughout history.  Any painting class (after Art I) is considered “advanced” and is targeted to students with interest in developing their painting skills. Students work in Acrylic Paint, Oil Paint, Gouache, Tempera and Watercolor paint.  Painting 2 and 3 students will receive weighted credit for their class.  Although classes are “stacked,” the lessons, projects and curriculum is differentiated for each level.   Prerequisite:  Art 1.  Students are required to take each class in level succession upon passing each course.

Printmaking 1,2,3:  Printmaking at its most basic level involves the creation of a plate (wood block, lino block, etching plate, etc.), inking that plate, and then transferring that ink onto paper. Essential to printmaking is the production of multiples and repetition. This class will introduce several printmaking media and techniques, including, but not limited to: relief, intaglio, collagraph, monotypes and serigraphy (screen printing). The focus is on fine art printmaking, not commercial or graphic design applications of printmaking. The technical aspects of each technique will be investigated through demonstrations, in class and out of class work, readings and slide lectures, designed to tie the history of printmaking in with the hands-on learning. Success in this course depends on combining presentation and technique with strong concepts, aesthetics, and a willingness to take risks to challenge your abilities and ideas. Prerequisite:  Art 1. Students are required to take each class in level succession upon passing each course.

Sculpture 1,2,3:  Students will fabricate sculptures in a variety of materials. Through visual and tactile experiences, we will explore the innovative use of materials in the realization of ideas. This provides the basis for students to develop an individual visual language, which in turn is informed and shaped by immersion in visual culture both present and past. Students will acquire the capacity to make both structural and aesthetic decisions. Students will develop competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills. Prerequisite:  Art 1.  Students are required to take each class in level succession upon passing each course.

Visual Arts Foundations (Art 1/Design 1 for art majors):  This course is required for our first year visual art majors who have been accepted into the Fine Arts Academy.  VA Foundations is a survey course in which students: create art work in a variety of media using diverse techniques (art production); study the work of artists, stylistic periods, and cultures/cultural relevance (art history); and  develop an understanding of the critique process and learn to read and interpret the visual language (art criticism).  Students will complete projects designed to teach and develop many techniques and skills including: ceramics, collage, design, drawing, mixed media, painting, printmaking, and sculpture.  This course is a solid foundation in a variety of media and fosters personal expression with a development of problem solving skills. Entry into VA Foundations is for majors and by interview only.

Art 1 (non Majors) is an entry level survey course in which students: create art works in a variety of media using diverse techniques (art production); study the work of artists, stylistic periods, and cultures (art history); and develop an understanding of the critique process and learn to read and interpret the visual language (art criticism).  Students will complete projects designed to teach and develop many techniques and skills, including drawing, sculpture, printmaking, design, painting, ceramic, and collage projects.

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Faculty

Cauthern, Bill
Visual Arts Faculty
william.cauthern@austinisd.org 512.414.8066
Ghazi, Mary
Visual Arts Faculty
mary.ghazinezhadiansh@austinisd.org 512.414.8065
O’Keefe, Ana
Visual Arts Faculty
ana.okeefe@austinisd.org anaokeefe.com
Seckar-Martinez, Jeff
Visual Arts Faculty
jeffrey.seckar-martinez@austinisd.org 512.414.8064 http://seckarmartinezartclass.weebly.com
West, Carey
Visual Arts Faculty
carey.west@austinisd.org 512.414.1980 http://mswestaparthistory.pbworks.com/w/page/36237865/FrontPage

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